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Spring 2014

OK. I know I haven’t been very attentive to the website. My apologies for steady readers. I’ll be planning to get back into my regular rhythm here this month.

So far spring has been an interesting one. I’ve been on the road nearly every week in the last month and quite a bit before that too. Thanks to modern technology it hasn’t been a problem for coaching. However, that usually isn’t a recipe for fitness success. I have managed to stay relatively fit, but not necessarily bike fit. I am getting on the bike 2-3 times a week, often on the trainer. Although I was able to sneak in a ride on the Pacific Coast Highway in Cali last week. 3.5 hours of ocean views and a gentle Pacific breeze = smiles all around.

I have also been trying to work in some bike building and am working on my first ultra-light steel frame with fillet brazed welds. This new process has been further complicated with a new torch set up and some very interesting tube shapes. I am excited for how the bike should ride and the 1400 gram frame weight (including integrated seat post), however I am not loving the constant sand/grind/file and rebraze, repeat… process I have developed that is all about learning the torch, steel, etc. As always, I am very confident in the structural integrity. I am a bit less confident I will ever get to the pro quality visual in the joints on this frame. Just a bit too many things done wrong in the start as I was learning about heat control, etc. The good news is that at this point I have finally gotten closer to having my set up correct and being able to work my material like I could before with the lugged frames.

On the racing side, I am hoping to get some races on my calendar once I get my base built back up on the bike. Luckily I am staying up for the next 4 weeks and should be able to retune towards some on bike time and look to race in May. On the up side, the team looks to be doing well and continue to stamp their mark on the Colorado race scene as usual.

Rough Finish

Seat Stay Miter

Head Tube Miter

Alignment Check

Rough Braze

Bottom Bracket Miter

Pacific Coast Highway

 

 

 

 

 

Cross Bike Pics

I am getting ready to start a new build. Since I kinda tore apart my road bike making mods and playing with different ways to reinforce the frame, it is time to get back on a CDS road frame again. I’ll post more on that later. I took some fun shots of my cross frame all dirtied up from some single track riding in the snow.

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Winter Training

The fitness is coming along OK. I’ve not gotten on the bike as much as I should, but since I don’t have the early season plans that I’ve had in the past (Valley of the Sun in February) I don’t feel too much pressure. I am fairly fit, but not bike fit. I have been doing a medley of activities to keep active and spice up the workouts instead of sitting on the trainer:

  1. Indoor Soccer: A great way to get the VO2 up since it is nothing but sprinting, especially if you have not skill (like me). Also a great way to get injured, especially knees and ankles.
  2. Trail Running:  I’ve really started to enjoy running.  Hitting a trail is SO much better than running around the neighborhood.  It gets tough in the winter when it snows a lot, but thankfully it hasn’t been too snowy until lately in the Boulder area.
  3. Swimming:  I try to swim  2-3 days a week to work the upper body and core a bit. I’m not too good at this either, but flailing around still gets a good workout if it isn’t that fast or pretty.
  4. Skiing:  A few times with the family, either downhill or cross country.  I recommend both, although cross country is a much more applicable training.  It seems like downhill should be a good way to stay a bit fit in the legs, but I have seen time and time that skiers that come out of the winter only doing downhill are not in bike shape.
  5. Yoga:  I am trying to do this once a week at a minimum.  My flexibility has really gotten worse over the fall and winter.  I have had a few injuries (hamstring, ankle, knee) that have limited my ability to do much yoga and it is starting to show up more in my other sporting endeavors.  The older I get the more important stretching has become.  I can feel the difference when I am limber or when I am not, especially running and riding.
  6. Trainer Time:  I need to start getting more focused on the bike.  I’ve been getting some trainer time in on the bike in the last week or two and will begin to ramp that up as the season approaches.
  7. Bike Time:  I have been hitting up the bike on the weekends and will begin commuting to work more again once the weather lightens up and I don’t have to coach soccer. (Starting in March)  I have felt OK on the Gateway rides, which is always a good indicator.  However I don’t have the on bike endurance I will need come this season.  There is only one way to get it and that’s by riding a lot more.  Finding time might be easy or tricky.  It really all depends on the weather at this point.
Chasing the family on the skinny skis.

Chasing the family on the skinny skis.

Dragging one of these around is a good way to make it a workout keeping up with the family.

Dragging one of these around is a good way to make it a workout keeping up with the family.

Back in the Day

I was looking through some old photos and realized that I really like falling on my left elbow.  After breaking it twice in 3 years, now I found this photo from when I got my front wheel swiped in a finish sprint by a college kid.  I imagine I have met my quota for scar tissue in the elbow joint.

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Great winter session with Rabid Frameworks and CDS  (Brent and myself) out at Hall Ranch going up the front side.

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Indoor BikeTraining

If you live in the US, just about everywhere has been hit by some nasty weather that inspires indoor training.  I for one am not a huge fan.  Although I have many a friend who can go hours on the trainer or even choose to when its 70 degrees out, I much prefer toughening it outside in extreme conditions or finding other things to do. However, I always take riding the trainer pretty serious in the January – March months.  Not only to get in time on the bike, but I have found it to be excellent prep for the season.   It’s a less stressful way to build up the miles and work in some real work in very short time frames.  Let’s just say, trainer time has its place in just about any cyclists racing/riding schedule.

I was recently interviewed and had an article published in Bicycling magazine recently that was all about winter training.  They asked me for ideas on how to make the trainer tolerable.  So here is what I sent them:

1.Don’t pedal aimlessly. Vary your intensity so that you have the recovery and interval portions of the effort to create short events that you can mentally target. An easy one is to watch a show and go all out during the commercials, then recover during the program.
2.Watch bike racing.  Cyclocross is perfect for the trainer and widely available for free online.  The action is constant and the races are short, intense efforts.
3.Find a buddy.  Riding the trainer with a partner takes out 70% of the boredom.  There are plenty of ways to use other folks around you as motivation.  Spin classes fall into this category.  Although, I tend to think of this in the same category as Zoomba, I think it is actually a pretty good way to stay bike fit.
4.Keep it short. Unless you are training for a major event and can’t ever get outdoors in that training block, trainer sessions shouldn’t be more than 1.5-2 hours max.  It is surprising how much fitness can be gained by a focused 45-60 minutes on the trainer.
I hope this helps everyone stay sane and fit this winter.

It’s that time of the year again:  Holiday Health Tips

My update for 2013 is that we have extended our holiday festivities for over a week.  I’ll be doing a bunch of running in single digit weather to keep the lbs. off and to stay fit.  It is also a great way take a break from the rush of things and regroup, especially for those needed that alone time to recharge.  Starting Saturday, I’ve ran over 4 hrs. and hope to keep up the focus with some indoor cycling and gym work tomorrow.

With Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas all coming along in the fall, it is a great time to add 5-10 pounds that we all have been working so hard to hold off.   Rather than counting calories and ruining your holidays by worrying about calories instead of enjoying the season, I have a simple list to keep the weight off.  (Or at least manageable)

  1. Don’t make a 1 day holiday into a 4 day holiday.  It is pretty easy to end up having Thanksgiving 4 times in November.  There can be two family gatherings, your company party, friends parties, your spouses parties, etc.   I suggest choosing one event to let loose on and then treat the other events like you would a typical day.  Overeating can become a snowball gaining momentum after the 3rd party and you eventually just give up the fight.
  2. Drink water.  I have talked about this a lot, so it is no surprise to end up here.  Drink a bunch of water before any event and then drink a bunch during the event.   It will keep you hydrated (obviously), counteract alcohol consumption, and prevent major overeating.
  3.  Minimize sugar.  I have talked a lot about this in the past as well.  Focus on eating the greens, meats, and fruit dishes and try to keep away from the candy based items.
  4. Minimize liquid calories.  It is easy to double your calorie intake at an event by drinking just as many calories as you eat.  The body doesn’t register liquid calories the same way as solids and they simply won’t make you feel full.  Alcohol can fall into this category.  A beer can have 100-200 calories per 12 oz and hard liquor shot is about the same.  Also keep in mind that these both have a lot of sugar in them.
  5. Burn the calories.  I have a tradition of running a ½ marathon the morning of Thanksgiving every year.  I don’t train for it and it is pretty painful, but it does create a pretty guilt free day after burning 1800 calories in the morning.   Even getting in family football game can be a good way to burn a few of those servings of bean casserole.
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